Get An Attractive Lawn In Just A Couple Of Hours A Week

Get An Attractive Lawn In Just A Couple Of Hours A Week



Time-strapped homeowners take heart-you can have an​ attractive lawn. Dedicating less than two hours a​ week to​ the​ average lawn can produce great results if​ you prioritize your tasks,​ says the​ nationally known "Yard Doctor,​" Trey Rogers,​ Ph.D.

A recent survey revealed that consumers' number one lawn care problem was finding enough time to​ care for their yards.

"Having a​ nice-looking yard is​ important to​ most homeowners,​" explains Rogers,​ the​ Michigan State University turf scientist who has helped grow grass for the​ Olympic Games as​ well as​ for average homeowners. "But when busy schedules create a​ time crunch,​ you can prioritize your lawn care tasks and look for shortcuts that will still allow you to​ have a​ good-looking lawn."

He suggests these time-savers:

• Cut your lawn less often. Never "scalp" your lawn thinking you can mow less often. Letting grass grow a​ little longer is​ far healthier than mowing too close. Scalping damages the​ grass blades,​ preventing the​ damaged lawn from fending off pests,​ disease and weeds. When you mow,​ cut only a​ third of​ the​ length of​ the​ grass.

• Water more efficiently. if​ you use manually placed sprinklers,​ set them properly the​ first time you use them so they water as​ much of​ your lawn as​ possible without sprinkling sidewalks or​ driveways. Mark the​ locations so you won't have to​ guess the​ next time. if​ you can leave the​ sprinkler attached to​ a​ water hose,​ you save a​ few more minutes-just unreel the​ hose. Water in​ the​ morning (perhaps while you are getting ready for work or​ getting the​ kids off to​ school) to​ enhance absorption and avoid evaporation.

• Get the​ kids to​ help. Put your kids in​ charge of​ easy yard care chores. Have them clear away all toys,​ sticks and other objects before you mow. They can also help with watering. Children should be out of​ the​ area and under supervision before you start to​ mow,​ however.

• Fertilize once,​ when it​ can do the​ most good. if​ you only have time for one application a​ year,​ fertilize at​ the​ beginning of​ the​ growing season with a​ slow-release nitrogen fertilizer. It's less likely to​ damage your lawn if​ your application technique is​ not perfect,​ and it​ will continue to​ work for weeks.

• Keep your mower in​ good working order. Have it​ tuned up once a​ year or​ do it​ yourself (it takes 30 minutes or​ less; learn how at​ www.yardsmarts.com).

The Yard Doctor is​ part of​ the​ Briggs & Stratton Yard Smarts program,​ created to​ help homeowners achieve the​ yard they really want to​ have by providing knowledge and inspiration on​ lawn and yard care.



If you are pressed for time but want your yard to​ look nice,​ mow the​ front lawn first and the​ back in​ a​ day or​ two.




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