How Computers Add A Logical Approach

How Computers Add A Logical Approach



How Computers Add - a​ Logical Approach
We looked at​ Number Systems and counting (see It's a​ Binary World - How Computers Count) last time .​
As a​ quick refresher,​ we​ saw that computers are made up of​ many units of​ 0 and 1,​ the​ binary system .​
1 is​ the​ highest digit possible so numbers in​ the​ computer are stored as​ for example 1010 or​ 10 in​ decimal .​
We also saw that these binary numbers can be seen as​ octal (8) or​ hexadecimal (16) numbers - in​ this case 1010 becomes 15 octal,​ or​ a​ hex.
You probably realise that the​ 'standard' PC code is​ in​ 8 bit bytes taking the​ hex system a​ stage further .​
You may also know that processors,​ and Windows software that runs on​ them,​ have progressed from 8 bits to​ 16 bits to​ 32 bits to​ 64 bits .​
Basically this means the​ computer can work on​ 1,​2,​ 4 or​ 8 bytes at​ once .​
Don't worry if​ this is​ all Gobbledegook,​ you don't need it​ to​ understand how computers add!
OK now to​ the​ Math - cringe time! It's a​ little more complicated than last time,​ but if​ you think logically,​ like a​ computer,​ realising they are really dumb,​ you will sail through it!
We take a​ break here to​ look at​ a​ bit of​ math you may not have heard of​ - Boolean Algebra .​
Once again it's really simple,​ but it​ shows you how a​ computer works,​ and why it​ is​ so pedantic!
Boolean Algebra is​ named after George Boole,​ an​ English Mathematician in​ the​ 19th Century .​
He devised the​ logic system used in​ digital computers more than a​ century before there was a​ computer to​ use it!
In Boolean Algebra,​ instead of​ + and - etc .​
we use AND and OR to​ form our logic steps.
For example:-
x OR y = z means if​ x or​ y is​ present,​ we​ get z.
However,​
x AND y = z means that both x and y need to​ be present to​ get z.
We can also consider an​ XOR (eXclusive OR).
x XOR y=z means that x or​ y BUT NOT BOTH must be present to​ get z .​
That's it! That's all the​ math you need to​ understand how a​ computer counts .​
Told you it​ was simple!
How do we​ use this logic in​ the​ computer? we​ make up a​ little electronic circuit called a​ Gate with transistors and things,​ so we​ can work on​ our binary numbers stored in​ a​ register - just a​ bit of​ memory .​
(And that's the​ last electronics you'll hear about!) .​
We make an​ AND gate,​ an​ OR gate,​ and an​ XOR gate
When we​ add in​ decimal,​ for example 9+3 we​ get 2 'units' and carry one to​ the​ 10s,​ giving 10+2=12
Remember the​ binary bit values in​ Decimal 1,​2,​4,​8 etc? we​ start at​ 0 then 1 in​ the​ first bit position,​ the​ 1 bit .​
If we​ add 1 + 1 binary we​ have to​ end up with 10,​ which has a​ 1 bit in​ the​ second bit position,​ and a​ 0 in​ the​ first,​ giving Decimal 2+0=2 .​
This second bit position is​ formed by a​ CARRY from the​ first bit.
To make an​ adder we​ must duplicate with a​ logic circuit the​ way we​ add in​ binary .​
To add 1+1 we​ need 3 inputs,​ one for each bit,​ and a​ carry in,​ and 2 outputs,​ one for the​ result (1 or​ 0),​ and a​ carry out,​ (1 or​ 0) .​
In this case the​ carry input is​ not used .​
We use 2 XOR gates,​ 2 AND gates and an​ OR gate to​ make up the​ adder for 1 bit.
Now we​ go another step,​ and forget about gates,​ because now we​ have a​ Logic Block,​ an​ ADDER .​
Our computer is​ designed by using various combinations of​ logic blocks .​
As well as​ the​ adder we​ might have a​ multiplier (a series of​ adders) and other components.
Our ADDER block takes one bit (0 or​ 1) from each number to​ be added,​ plus the​ Carry bit (0 or​ 1) and produces an​ output of​ 0 or​ 1,​ and a​ carry of​ 0 or​ 1 .​
a​ table of​ the​ input A,​ B and Carry,​ and output O and Carry,​ looks like this:-
With no Carry in:
A B c O C
0 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 1 0
0 1 0 1 0
1 1 0 0 1
With Carry in:
A B c O C
0 0 1 1 0
1 0 1 0 1
0 1 1 0 1
1 1 1 1 1
This is​ known as​ a​ Truth Table,​ it​ shows output state for any given input state.
Let's add 2+3 decimal .​
That is​ 010 plus 011 binary .​
We will need 3 ADDER blocks for decimal bit values of​ 1,​ 2 and 4)
The first ADDER takes the​ Least Significant Bit (decimal bit value 1) from each number .​
Input a​ will be 0,​ input B will be 1 with no carry - 0.
From the​ truth table this gives an​ output of​ 1 and a​ carry of​ 0 (3rd row) .​
BIT 1 RESULT = 1
At the​ same time the​ next ADDER (decimal bit value 2) has inputs of​ 1,​ 1 and a​ carry of​ 0,​ giving an​ output of​ 0 with a​ carry bit of​ 1 (4th row) .​
BIT 2 RESULT = 0
The next ADDER (decimal bit value 4) has inputs of​ 0,​ 0 and a​ carry of​ 1,​ giving an​ output of​ 1 with no carry - 0 (5th row) .​
BIT 4 RESULT = 1.
So we​ have bits 4,​2,​1 as​ 101 or​ 4+1=5.
It seems like a​ laborious way to​ do it,​ but our computer can have 64 adders or​ more,​ adding simultaneously two large numbers billions of​ times a​ second .​
This is​ where the​ computer scores.
Next time we​ will get to​ how a​ computer performs more complcated operations,​ and it's simple!




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