The Role Of The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner A Look Into Sane Programs

The Role Of The Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner A Look Into Sane Programs



The Role of​ the​ Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner a​ Look Into SANE Programs
Studies have shown that less than half of​ the​ victims of​ sexual assault treated in​ emergency rooms get basic help with information about the​ risk of​ pregnancy or​ emergency contraception to​ prevent pregnancy.
They have to​ wait for sometimes up to​ six hours for treatment,​ and during this wait,​ they’re told not to​ eat,​ drink,​ or​ even use the​ bathroom before they’re examined because it​ might destroy evidence.
By the​ time of​ the​ examination,​ victims often feel reraped from the​ treatment by the​ staff of​ the​ emergency room. For this reason,​ emergency rooms are realizing a​ need for SANE programs.
SANE’s are registered nurses who have specialized training in​ examining victims of​ sexual assault. They provide much needed emotional support for victims as​ well as​ testify in​ trials as​ expert witnesses in​ the​ victim’s perpetrator’s trials.
They have extensive training in​ forensic evidence collection,​ expert witness testimony,​ STD treatment,​ and pregnancy evaluation. 75% of​ SANE programs are hospital based,​ housed in​ the​ emergency rooms while 25% are in​ the​ community setting at​ rape crisis centers or​ health clinics.
The first SANE programs started in​ the​ mid 1970’s but it​ wasn’t until the​ late 1980’s that the​ programs got a​ major growth spurt as​ they grew more rapidly in​ the​ 1990’s when localities started to​ see the​ benefits of​ what these SANE programs have to​ offer. And by 1996,​ there were approximately 70 programs in​ existence.
Now,​ there are at​ least 280 SANE programs throughout the​ United States. Nearly all of​ these SANE programs serve adolescents and adults,​ and around half serve pediatric patients.
The programs are staffed by RN’s and nurse practitioners that conduct forensic exams of​ victims of​ sexual assault. They are required by law to​ report to​ local law enforcement sexual assaults that may have caused the​ victim injury.
On the​ other hand,​ the​ victim has the​ right to​ decide to​ have evidence collected and cooperate with law enforcement by providing them with information. After a​ SANE program is​ established,​ most emergency room personnel are relieved by the​ service that SANE’s provide.
Many municipalities are starting to​ see the​ need in​ these much needed programs. They offer a​ great service to​ victims by quickly processing forensic evidence and giving emotional support while making their time to​ wait for examination as​ short as​ possible.
As SANE programs get more and more popular,​ we’ll start to​ see many more of​ these programs as​ time goes on​ and this can only help the​ victims of​ sexual violence and help put their perpetrators behind bars so they won’t have a​ chance to​ hurt anyone else.




You Might Also Like:




No comments:

Powered by Blogger.