The Early Digital Camera



The Early Digital Camera

The Early Digital Camera
A digital camera is​ basically a​ device that enables images to​ be captured .​
The images are stored electronically rather than on film .​
This process involves converting light into electrical charges, and​ then translating this back into the​ image that was seen through the​ camera LCD .​
Although the​ device is​ a​ recent addition to​ the​ world of​ photography, the​ concept of​ the​ possibility of​ a​ digital camera was begu​n in​ the​ 1950s .​
The early concept of​ the​ digital camera was closely linked to​ television technology .​
It began with digital images being recorded on scanners and​ in​ the​ form of​ digital video signals .​
In 1951 broadcasting companies were recording images as​ electrical impulses and​ onto magnetic tape from their television cameras, and​ this paved the​ way for​ digital camera technology to​ begin .​
By 1956 electrical impulse recordings were common practise within film industry, and​ camera manufacturers began to​ dream of​ a​ device .​
The first record of​ a​ patent for​ a​ type of​ digital camera was in​ 1972 when Texas Instruments patented a​ camera that did not require film .​
However, the​ patent revealed a​ more analog based design rather than a​ digital device, and​ there is​ no record of​ whether the​ camera was actually created .​
What the​ patent does show, however, is​ that interest towards a​ digital camera was growing with the​ idea that the​ need for​ film could be removed .​
a​ pioneer in​ the​ history of​ digital camera was Steve Sasson, an​ engineer at​ Kodak .​
Digital images of​ the​ moon were being transmitted via satellite by NASA, using a​ mosaic photo sensor, and​ he saw the​ possibility of​ a​ digital device for​ commercial use .​
In 1972 he began to​ group together available equipment used within the​ film industry to​ create an​ image digitally rather than on film .​
Central to​ this early concept of​ the​ digital device, and​ still used by digital cameras today, is​ the​ Charged Coupled Device .​
The CCD detects light and​ colour intensity and​ then converts this information into electrons .​
The value of​ each cell in​ the​ image is​ then read, and​ converted to​ binary format to​ make the​ image computer compatible .​
Steve Sasson produced his first digital image in​ 1979 .​
The image took a​ total of​ 23 seconds to​ take, and​ a​ further 23 seconds to​ read from the​ playback unit .​
Although the​ image was less than perfect, it​ showed that the​ device was a​ possibility .​
Kodak had developed a​ camera that developed picture from light, but it​ was never manufactured for​ the​ public.
The first camera to​ be marketed was the​ Sony Mavica electronic still camera in​ 1981 .​
It was not a​ true digital camera as​ the​ image was recorded on mini disc, and​ then attached to​ a​ television or​ video .​
It was more a​ freeze frame video camera but it​ greatly influenced people`s attitude to​ the​ recorded image .​
It made public the​ possibility of​ a​ camera that stored images using techniques other than film .​
It still used more television technology but was the​ first hand held with the​ general idea of​ digital camera usage .​
Cameras that could transmit images via satellite became popular, but were used by the​ media only due to​ the​ expense incurred .​
The possibilities were becoming apparent and​ images were used for​ news coverage .​
The first camera for​ general use with a​ computer was the​ Apple Quicktake 100 camera which appeared in1984 .​
In 1986 the​ Canon RC-701 was used for​ coverage of​ the​ Olympics, with quality images printed in​ the​ newspaper .​
This showed the​ possible quality, and​ the​ desire for​ the​ digital camera was born.
The first mega pixel sensor was invented in​ 1986 .​
It contained 1.4 million pixels and​ was suitable for​ a​ digital image measuring 5x7 inches .​
In 1987 accessories for​ storing, printing, manipulating, transmitting, and​ recording digital images came onto the​ market, with the​ Fuji DS-P1 arriving in​ 1988 .​
This is​ arguably the​ first true digital camera as​ recognised today, boasting a​ 16MB memory card .​
With the​ arrival of​ JPEG and​ MPEG standards in​ the​ 1990`s, the​ face of​ the​ digital camera was changed for​ ever .​
Kodak marketed the​ first readily available digital camera that met all standards, with the​ Kodak DC40 in​ 1995.

The Early Digital Camera





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