Profiles Of The Powerful Advertising Exec Mary Austen

Profiles Of The Powerful Advertising Exec Mary Austen



Profiles of​ the​ Powerful Advertising Exec Mary Austen
When you spend time with Mary Stengel Austen, you come away with one feeling. That woman is​ affable. After thinking it​ over, you might find other words which describe her smart, realistic, enthusiastic, tough minded, determined, articulate, strategic, focused. But youll always include affable in​ your memory of​ her because thats what she is.
Perhaps she has to​ be that way because of​ the​ two most significant challenges in​ her life managing five small children and​ managing one of​ the​ largest ad agencies in​ this part of​ the​ country, Tierney Communications. Affable is​ good, perhaps necessary.
Having grown up in​ this area, she then graduated from Lafayette College and​ was directed to​ a​ job in​ sales for​ age copier company. Quickly convinced that she was not made for​ a​ direct sales role, she found her way into the​ former Spiro agency and​ found the​ career that challenged her, enthused her and​ excited her. Obviously, she loved what she did and, after a​ few other steps forward, she still loves what she does as​ president and​ CEO of​ Tierney and​ its 135 employees.
Mary sees great opportunity for​ the​ advertising business but she insists that success will come to​ those who understand that its a​ time for​ new reality. Thats her way to​ acknowledge and​ respect change which is​ happening faster and​ faster. She believes that
agencies must adapt more quickly to​ market changes, technology changes and​ even to​ the​ changing expectations of​ employees. More than ever before, she hopes that Tierney is​ understanding and​ respecting clients perceptions of​ their own needs which often change with the​ speed of​ light.
Her concerns for​ the​ overall health of​ the​ agency business are partially based on the​ pressures clients feel in​ these changing times. Its not a​ new thought that solid relationships with clients are vital for​ ad agencies. However, those relationships are harder and​ harder to​ develop because of​ the​ pressures of​ time and​ the​ pressures of​ the​ bottom line. However, she says the​ key to​ a​ superb client relationship is​ no different today than it​ was ten years ago. Just remember that Its not about you, its about your client. Good advice.
When pressed, she has some advice for​ clients, too. Directed to​ clients in​ just a​ few words, the​ wisdom of​ Mary Stengel Austen is​ simple to​ state. She would ask them to​ be careful about articulating the​ business plan and​ the​ marketing objectives to​ the​ agency. She would urge them to​ have realistic expectations about their marketing/advertising efforts. She would hope for​ an open, honest working relationship with the​ agency and​ a​ consistent viewpoint about image, brand and​ sales. She also fully understands that clients have their own pressures and​ sometimes are forced to​ abandon well thought out plans.
A consistent lesson has guided her in​ her home life, in​ college and​ in​ her career. She has learned the​ importance of​ being able to​ multitask. She says that learning to​ juggle has helped her in​ her career and​ in​ her role as​ a​ Mother. According to​ her, Kids and​ clients have helped me to​ learn how to​ prioritize and​ have forced me to​ remain focused. She further explains, Both clients and​ children need to​ feel as​ if​ they are the​ most important thing in​ your world. in​ these two separate situations, they are, so its working out quite well for​ Mary, for​ Tierney and​ for​ her family.
Predictably, her hopes for​ her own career cover a​ broad spectrum of​ topics. When she thinks about her life in​ ten years, she first mentions her family and​ its importance. Then she talks about continuing to​ enjoy her work, about continuing to​ learn and​ grow and​ continuing to​ do the​ things she does best. She is​ quite comfortable and​ enjoys managing good people and​ hopes to​ continue that function. She also wants as​ much strategic involvement as​ possible, both in​ her own operation and​ in​ the​ operations of​ clients.
She gives an interesting example. When a​ client crisis occurs, she hopes to​ contribute to​ the​ strategy/solution and​ to​ Slow things down when others are compelled to​ speed things up. She seems calm and, apparently, is​ convinced that calm and​ smart is​ better than frenzied and​ active without a​ good plan.
Mary Stengel Austen is​ even more than a​ busy, successful executive at​ Tierney and​ a​ busy, effective family woman. She is​ also a​ committed supporter of​ the​ community, serving on many boards including the​ Please Touch Museum, Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital, Maternity Care Coalition, Philadelphia Ad Club, Lafayette College Advisory Council and​ as​ Chairperson of​ the​ Pennsylvania Economy League.
She lives in​ Radnor with her husband, Peter, who is​ an Insurance Broker and​ her five children Thomas8, Andrew 7, Christopher 6, John 4 and​ Sally 2.
Affable? Yes. Successful? Yes. a​ nice combination!




You Might Also Like:




No comments:

Powered by Blogger.