How To Teach Your Dog To Eliminate On Command

How To Teach Your Dog To Eliminate On Command



Teaching your dog to​ defecate or​ urinate on​ command is​ actually hust a​ process of​ creating an​ association.

The command I use is,​ "Get Busy." But you​ can use any word or​ phrase that you​ please.

You're probably wondering why anyone would want to​ teach their dog an​ elimination command. And probably the​ best answer to​ this question is​ that it​ enables you​ to​ establish both a​ time and a​ place for your dog to​ eliminate.

For example,​ if​ you​ decide to​ go to​ bed early,​ and you​ don't want your dog to​ be uncomfortable for the​ next 7 or​ 8 hours,​ you​ can very easily take him outside and tell him to​ "do it​ now,​" because,​ "You won't have a​ chance to​ do it​ later since I'm going to​ bed."

Having an​ elimination command also allows you​ to​ tell your dog WHERE he should urinate or​ defecate. For example,​ if​ you're taking your pup for a​ stoll and he indicates that he needs to​ eliminate... you​ don't want him to​ merely stop and do his business in​ the​ middle of​ the​ sidewalk. What an​ elimination command allows you​ to​ do is​ to​ walk the​ dog over to​ some bushes,​ or​ behind a​ building and tell him,​ "Here! Here is​ where you​ can 'get busy.'"

How to​ teach the​ "Get Busy" command

Just like with any other command,​ your goal is​ to​ associate the​ phrase,​ "Get busy,​" with the​ action of​ either defecating or​ urinating.

Here's what you​ need to​ do in​ 5 easy steps:

1.) Take note of​ the​ usual times your dog needs to​ defecate or​ urinate.

2.) Take him to​ the​ usual spot where he likes to​ eliminate and walk him back and forth,​ repeating the​ phrase,​ "Get busy,​ get busy,​ get busy."

3.) When he begins to​ eliminate,​ continue saying,​ "Get busy." After five or​ six different occasions,​ your command will start to​ link with the​ behavior.

4.) a​ half second after he finishes,​ praise him.

5.) Repeat this process every time your dog needs to​ eliminate,​ and you'll soon find that he will begin to​ understand and at​ least make an​ attempt to​ evacuate the​ contents of​ his bladder on​ command.

That's all for now,​ folks!
Adam
Dogproblems.com




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