History Of Computer Viruses Since 2001

History Of Computer Viruses Since 2001



Virus History – 2001 to​ Present
After the​ flurry of​ viruses that haunted 2001,​ 2002 was amazingly quiet .​
Unfortunately,​ 2003 took off again.
January saw the​ SQL Slammer worm infect over 75,​000 systems in​ about ten minutes .​
It attacked a​ flaw in​ Microsoft’s SQL Server,​ and basically slowed down the​ entire Internet.
The Blaster worm attacked in​ August .​
It was meant to​ cause a​ Denial of​ Service attack against the​ Windows Update website,​ by causing all infected systems to​ flood the​ site on​ August 15th .​
the​ programmer was convicted because investigators actually found his name in​ the​ virus code.
Only a​ few days later,​ SoBig attacked .​
This was another emailing virus .​
After infection,​ it​ searched the​ files on​ the​ hard drive for email addresses and sent itself to​ any it​ found.
October saw the​ release of​ the​ Sober emailing virus .​
Sober was notable in​ that it​ would shut off antivirus programs after infection.
The fastest-spreading virus to​ date was MyDoom,​ which struck in​ January 2004 .​
At one point,​ MyDoom was responsible for 1 out of​ every 10 emails on​ the​ Internet.
2004 also saw the​ Witty,​ Sasser,​ and Santy virus outbreaks,​ and in​ 2005,​ Zotob and Samy.
In 2006,​ the​ first Mac OS/X virus was announced,​ as​ well as​ the​ first MySpace attack,​ LordoftheNoose,​ This program changed the​ names of​ MySpace profiles,​ and locked out users to​ keep the​ names it​ set .​
At one point,​ as​ many as​ 70% of​ all MySpace profiles were infected.
So far in​ 2007,​ another MySpace virus has erupted,​ and the​ Peacomm Virus attacked .​
Peacomm was an​ email that claimed to​ be a​ video clip.
Historically,​ most viruses have used very similar attack routes .​
Either they carried an​ attachment which the​ user had to​ open,​ or​ they took advantage of​ a​ known flaw in​ the​ system which had not yet been fixed .​
the​ moral of​ the​ story is​ this: Keep your updates current,​ and be wary of​ unusual attachments.




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