Dog Adoption

Dog Adoption



Dog Adoption
Paloma is​ a​ runner. She loves to​ run. She doesnt run anywhere in​ particular,​ mind you,​ she just enjoys the​ experience. Sometimes she gets to​ run in​ wide open spaces,​ like at​ the​ park,​ sometimes she runs alongside her moms bike,​ and sometimes she just runs back and forth through the​ house. to​ her,​ it​ doesnt much matter,​ just as​ long as​ she gets to​ run. the​ way her life started out,​ however,​ it​ was possible that she might never have gotten the​ chance.
Paloma is​ a​ oneyearold half English setter/half English pointer mix. Her name,​ which is​ Spanish for dove,​ was bestowed upon her because as​ a​ very young puppy,​ she was entirely white. the​ result of​ an accidental breeding between two show dogs,​ Paloma and her six sisters were unexpected and unwanted by the​ owners of​ both parent dogs. Fortunately,​ all seven dogs made their way to​ a​ pointer rescue shelter,​ and have since all found happy homes.
Palomas story is​ not a​ unique. Thousands of​ dogs across the​ country are in​ need of​ rescuing and go unadopted. Often these animals spend the​ rest of​ their lives in​ shelters,​ colloquially known as​ the​ pound. Those that are not cannot be adopted are euthanized. the​ reasons these dogs wind up in​ shelters vary. Some of​ them were bought as​ Christmas presents for a​ child,​ but soon the​ parents had second thoughts as​ it​ became clear that the​ puppy might be more trouble than they anticipated. Others ran away and were picked up by animal control or​ the​ local human society,​ but went unclaimed by their owners. Still others had to​ be given up due to​ their owners allergies or​ other health problems. Yet most of​ these dogs still have plenty of​ years of​ companionship and affection left in​ them,​ and would love nothing more than to​ be taken in​ by someone who will love and care for them.
Some people may be hesitant to​ adopt a​ shelter dog,​ for fear of​ health or​ behavior problems. While some dogs may have behavior problems as​ a​ result of​ being abused or​ neglected by their previous owners,​ not all shelter dogs are like this,​ and those that are can usually be retrained by someone who happens to​ be particularly patient. Dog lovers are encouraged to​ ask questions about a​ dogs background before adopting,​ in​ order to​ avoid potential problems and frustrations. Nearly all shelters will not allow a​ dog to​ be adopted until any health problems have been successfully treated. Any information on​ treatment of​ chronic conditions or​ other special needs will be passed on​ to​ the​ new owner.
If you​ or​ someone you​ know is​ in​ search of​ a​ new best friend,​ consider a​ trip to​ the​ local shelter instead of​ the​ pet store. Adoption is​ often cheaper than buying a​ puppy,​ and the​ dogs are just as​ friendly and loving,​ if​ not more so. Plus,​ most are already housebroken! to​ get started on​ the​ search a​ new best friend,​ call your local humane society or​ search online at​ PetFinder. com.




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