Coping With Sexual Misinformation

Coping With Sexual Misinformation



Coping with Sexual Misinformation
Sex,​ as​ a​ conversation piece,​ is​ not the​ best way to​ break the​ ice. This topic is​ still considered taboo for some conservative countries. More so is​ the​ idea of​ incorporating sexual education into the​ academic curriculum.
Former U. S. Surgeon General Joycelyn Elders at​ a​ Community Health Centers of​ Arkansas summit on​ health care said that the​ lack of​ sex education in​ the​ nation is​ deafening and it​ makes children vulnerable to​ sexual assault and sexually transmitted diseases. She added that the​ country is​ paying a​ very heavy price for not educating our young people. She also said that abstinenceonly sex education programs are unrealistic,​ adding to​ it​ abstinenceonly programs that do not teach contraception will not solve the​ issue.
Studies show that most of​ the​ youth today who become sexually active,​ engage in​ the​ act without accurate information about reproductive health. This insufficiency of​ information can increase the​ risk of​ unplanned pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted diseases STD. Sexual health education can be one means of​ helping young people prevent these problems and improve their future reproductive health.
According to​ an expert on​ adolescent health,​ sex education programs may be the​ only way that the​ youth can learn accurate information about reproductive health. Sex education programs may offer the​ only setting in​ which young people can attain the​ skills necessary to​ maintain good reproductive health.
Misinformation and misunderstandings about conception,​ family planning,​ and STD risks abound among young adults. in​ Jamaica,​ research conducted by the​ University of​ the​ West Indies and FHIs Womens Studies Project found that a​ group of​ young adults had little knowledge about reproductive health issues. the​ study surveyed about 500 students,​ ages 11 to​ 14,​ as​ they began an inschool family life education program designed to​ delay first pregnancy. Students in​ this group were considered to​ be at​ highrisk for early sexual activity.
Because of​ the​ lack of​ information on​ sex and how to​ cope with its consequences,​ a​ lot of​ our youth either have unwanted pregnancies and/or STDs,​ and they don’t know what to​ do. Further discussion on​ this matter is​ necessary,​ and that’s where sexual health clinics play an important role.
A sexual health clinic is​ a​ clinic that specializes in​ curing sexuallyrelated concerns. Sexual health clinics have been known as​ venereal disease VD clinics,​ sexually transmitted disease STD clinics and genitourinary medicine GUM clinics. Almost every sexual health clinic will,​ at​ the​ very least,​ have one public health nurse who can discuss sexual issues with visitors and patients and provide referrals to​ community agencies for additional information. Bigger clinics may have a​ full medical staff who can provide a​ full range of​ sexualityrelated test services,​ including testing for,​ protection from or​ treatment of​ STDs,​ and perhaps even psychological counseling. Very few sexual health clinics offer abortion services.
The biggest concern for a​ lot of​ people is​ the​ issue of​ confidentiality. GUM clinics are aware of​ this matter,​ and take every step to​ protect every patient’s privacy. All material relating to​ every visit is​ totally confidential and will never be made available to​ anybody who shouldnt see it. if​ the​ patient would prefer,​ they dont even have to​ give their name.
Where the​ school’s duty to​ inform kids of​ reproductive health ends,​ that’s where the​ sexual health clinic’s duty begins. Being sexually active is​ a​ choice and it​ must me made with utmost care. Know the​ facts before you jump in​ the​ bandwagon and engage in​ sex.




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