Computers May Be Slowing Down

Computers May Be Slowing Down



Computers May Be Slowing Down
In 1965 Gordon Moore,​ the​ co-founder of​ Intel,​ wrote a​ paper that made the​ observation that computers will double in​ speed every two years .​
This maxim,​ now called Moore’s Law,​ has held true for decades .​
It would appear now however that within the​ next ten years Moore’s Law may no longer be valid.
Moore’s Law specifically refers to​ the​ number of​ transistors that can be placed on​ a​ computer chip,​ and how that number could easily be doubled by manufacturers every two years .​
Manufactures have readily met the​ requirements of​ this law since its inception,​ and as​ of​ 2008 the​ transistors that are applied to​ computer chips will be so small that over 3.9 million of​ them would fit on​ the​ head of​ a​ pin.
Gordon Moore now says that by 2020 the​ laws of​ physics will catch up to​ computer chip manufacturers and Moore’s Law will no longer be a​ valid measuring tool .​
Mr .​
Moore revealed this information while speaking about the​ new Intel chip being marketed as​ the​ Penryn Processor .​
This new chip will not be widely available till 2009,​ and its circuitry is​ 45 nanometers wide (1 billionth of​ a​ meter wide) and contains over 800 million transistors.
The fact that Moore’s Law specifically refers to​ number of​ transistors and not computing speed has now become important .​
The two have been used interchangeably for decades,​ but it​ would seem that can no longer be the​ case .​
Many experts believe that although the​ laws of​ physics will break down Moore’s Law,​ computing speed will continue to​ increase at​ the​ same rate or​ possible even faster .​
This will be done through alternative methods of​ chip manufacturing .​
One type of​ alternative manufacturing is​ called nanotechnology which would focus on​ putting chips together a​ single molecule at​ a​ time .​
Jim Tully at​ Gartner group said,​ You might refer to​ this new breed of​ chips as​ ‘molecular devices’ .​
Science fiction may become science fact over the​ next decade as​ these molecular devices are even now in​ development.
While faster chips are a​ concern for the​ manufactures,​ utilizing this speed is​ the​ concern of​ the​ end user .​
Chips that contain billions of​ transistors are irrelevant if​ the​ software the​ computer is​ running cannot take advantage of​ the​ speed .​
This has been the​ case with Windows XP of​ late,​ and one of​ the​ reasons Microsoft released Vista .​
The new software is​ designed to​ take better advantage of​ newer and faster chips as​ well as​ higher degrees of​ computer memory .​
Although the​ Vista 32 bit version only uses up to​ 4 gig of​ RAM (same as​ XP),​ the​ Vista 64 bit version can support 128 gig of​ RAM or​ more,​ says Dan Crawford,​ former Microsoft employee and software enthusiast .​
There are no PCs currently capable of​ actually accepting 128 gig of​ RAM so this issue should be moot for a​ long time.
Once software producers catch up to​ the​ chips available even now,​ the​ speed in​ which users enjoy on​ there computers will be greatly increased .​
Chip speed is​ still an​ important concern,​ but perhaps not more so than the​ ability to​ actually utilize that speed on​ a​ regular basis.




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